'Cultural identity, conservation approaches, and dissemination: conserving the wall paintings of Nagaur Fort, Rajasthan, India'

Charlotte Martin de Fonjaudran, Sibylla Tringham, S. Bogin, S. Menon, K. Jasol

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Nagaur's stunning complex of sprawling palaces, pools, and ancillary buildings extends over 15 hectares, surrounded by massive fortification walls. From its 18th-century golden period, its decline continued through the 20th century until the Mehrangarh Museum Trust began its conservation in 1993. Following award-winning architectural interventions, the Trust moved on to its exceptional wall paintings. Gathering a range of international partners, the Trust aimed to demonstrate how integrated architectural and wall painting conservation programs can reestablish Nagaur Fort as a major regional cultural landmark. Here, conservation approaches are outlined and examined for the 18th-century Rajput-Mughal wall paintings in the Sheesh Mahal. Knowledge transfer for wall painting conservation is discussed. The benefits of long-term and continuous collaboration on-site between wall painting conservators from abroad and conservation professionals in India are emphasized.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationICOM-CC 16th Triennial Conference 2011 Proceedings
Place of PublicationLisbon
PublisherAlmada
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

India
Dissemination
Rajasthan
Cultural Identity
Wall Paintings
Conservation
Knowledge Transfer
Conservators
Mughal
Fortification
Landmarks
Palace

Cite this

Martin de Fonjaudran, C., Tringham, S., Bogin, S., Menon, S., & Jasol, K. (2011). 'Cultural identity, conservation approaches, and dissemination: conserving the wall paintings of Nagaur Fort, Rajasthan, India'. In ICOM-CC 16th Triennial Conference 2011 Proceedings Lisbon: Almada.

'Cultural identity, conservation approaches, and dissemination: conserving the wall paintings of Nagaur Fort, Rajasthan, India'. / Martin de Fonjaudran, Charlotte ; Tringham, Sibylla; Bogin, S.; Menon, S. ; Jasol, K. .

ICOM-CC 16th Triennial Conference 2011 Proceedings. Lisbon : Almada, 2011.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Martin de Fonjaudran, C, Tringham, S, Bogin, S, Menon, S & Jasol, K 2011, 'Cultural identity, conservation approaches, and dissemination: conserving the wall paintings of Nagaur Fort, Rajasthan, India'. in ICOM-CC 16th Triennial Conference 2011 Proceedings. Almada, Lisbon.
Martin de Fonjaudran C, Tringham S, Bogin S, Menon S, Jasol K. 'Cultural identity, conservation approaches, and dissemination: conserving the wall paintings of Nagaur Fort, Rajasthan, India'. In ICOM-CC 16th Triennial Conference 2011 Proceedings. Lisbon: Almada. 2011
Martin de Fonjaudran, Charlotte ; Tringham, Sibylla ; Bogin, S. ; Menon, S. ; Jasol, K. . / 'Cultural identity, conservation approaches, and dissemination: conserving the wall paintings of Nagaur Fort, Rajasthan, India'. ICOM-CC 16th Triennial Conference 2011 Proceedings. Lisbon : Almada, 2011.
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